Workshop “Pluralising Practices”: Linz, June 1st-3rd 2016

We’re happy to announce our third workshop which will take place at the University of Arts and Design, Linz, Austria, June 1st-3rd 2016.
Over the last two decades, increasingly diverse intellectual practices have become subsumed under the heading cultural studies. These engagements speak from different linguistic, regional, national and diasporic contexts, draw on specific local traditions and methodologies, and are forking distinct trajectories, thus making it impossible to speak of a unified cultural studies. This heterogeneity has led to an increasing emphasis on decolonising knowledge and the need for new transcultural approaches that transcend the limitations of regional studies. On the one hand, this development highlights the necessity of translation: of languages, concepts, different academic approaches. On the other, this decolonial momentum reasserts cultural studies as a political project that exceeds academic spaces of knowledge and opens itself to epistemologies that challenge the university’s Eurocentrism, gender and class gaps from the outside. These multiform spaces of knowledge become inhabitable at the intersection of artistic, academic and activist modes of knowledge production, in spaces and via events open to a diverse public. They can be discerned in new models of publishing not exclusively reserved to academia, such as open-access online journals or blogs that utilise the virtual and accessible space of the internet.

This two-day workshop invites to reflect on practices of epistemological translation between diverse knowledge spaces. How can we translate between spaces inside and outside of academia? How can we encourage decolonial agendas when negotiating between institutional and other agents? Furthermore, we invite scholars to reflect on, propose and invent practices of cultural studies in virtual and other spaces. What kinds of practices do we have to create such open spaces? How can we inhabit them?

Participants: Anna Artaker (Vienna), Hongwei Bao (Nottingham), Henriette Gunkel (London), Karin Harrasser (Linz), Katrin Köppert (Linz), Anja Michaelsen (Bochum), Sumugan Sivanesan (Berlin), Daniel Winkler (Innsbruck)

Organizers: Alexander Dunst (Paderborn), Elahe Haschemi Yekani (Flensburg), Anja Schwarz (Potsdam), Gudrun Rath (Linz)

 

 

Minor Culture: Melbourne, 1st – 3rd December 2015

Cultural Studies Association of Australasia

Minor Culture creates a space for inter-disciplinary dialogues around the study of place, identity and marginality, and addresses research on everyday cultural productions and media texts, cultural policy and discourses of sustainability, digital life and creative industries, and public cultures in the Asia-Pacific region. The conference also invites responses to the following questions:
  • How are minor cultures inhabited? When do minor cultures become uninhabitable?
  • Is the concept of minority still useful in explaining contemporary forms of cultural marginality?
  • How do categories such as indigeneity and Aboriginality, gender and sexuality, class, disability, race and citizenship produce minoritising effects? How might these categories change when mobilised through governmental discourses, newsmedia, and everyday usage?
  • Who narrates experiences of minoritisation? For whom are these narratives produced? How is minoritarianism articulated through film, music, television, literature, performance, and digital cultures?
  • In what ways do practices of government and cultural policy shape relationships between local, national and transnational cultures? To what extent are legal regulations implicated in the formation of minoritarian practices?
  • How do new minor or major cultural formations emerge? Through which means do political practices resist or intervene in these formations?
  • Do minor cultures require novel theoretical tools or research methodologies? What do “experimental” approaches to cultural research look like? What alternative kinds of knowledge could such approaches make available?
  • Is minority a humanist concept? What place could “majority” and “minority” have within post-anthropocentric thinking?
  • And when do minor cultures cease to be minor?

Find more information here.

Working Papers

criticalhabitations features longer work by authors associated with the blog for you to read and comment.

Dunst, Alexander, Elahe Haschemi Yekani, and Anja Schwarz. “The Here and Now of Cultural Studies.” Journal for the Study of British Cultures 21.2 (2014): 195-222.

Eckstein, Lars, and Anja Schwarz. Postcolonial Piracy: Media Distribution and Cultural Production in the Global South. London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2014.

Dunst, Alexander, “Introduction: Third Reality – On the Persistence of Philip K. Dick”, in: The World According to Philip K. Dick. Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave, 2015, 1-10.

ACS Institute on “Precarious Futures”, 7-12 December 2015: University of the Free State in Bloemfontein

The Association for Cultural Studies (ACS) is delighted to announce the third ACS Institute, which will be held from 7-12 December 2015 at the University of the Free State in Bloemfontein, South Africa. The theme of the 2015 Institute is “Precarious Futures.”

More information here.