Minor Culture: Melbourne, 1st – 3rd December 2015

Cultural Studies Association of Australasia

Minor Culture creates a space for inter-disciplinary dialogues around the study of place, identity and marginality, and addresses research on everyday cultural productions and media texts, cultural policy and discourses of sustainability, digital life and creative industries, and public cultures in the Asia-Pacific region. The conference also invites responses to the following questions:
  • How are minor cultures inhabited? When do minor cultures become uninhabitable?
  • Is the concept of minority still useful in explaining contemporary forms of cultural marginality?
  • How do categories such as indigeneity and Aboriginality, gender and sexuality, class, disability, race and citizenship produce minoritising effects? How might these categories change when mobilised through governmental discourses, newsmedia, and everyday usage?
  • Who narrates experiences of minoritisation? For whom are these narratives produced? How is minoritarianism articulated through film, music, television, literature, performance, and digital cultures?
  • In what ways do practices of government and cultural policy shape relationships between local, national and transnational cultures? To what extent are legal regulations implicated in the formation of minoritarian practices?
  • How do new minor or major cultural formations emerge? Through which means do political practices resist or intervene in these formations?
  • Do minor cultures require novel theoretical tools or research methodologies? What do “experimental” approaches to cultural research look like? What alternative kinds of knowledge could such approaches make available?
  • Is minority a humanist concept? What place could “majority” and “minority” have within post-anthropocentric thinking?
  • And when do minor cultures cease to be minor?

Find more information here.

Working Papers

criticalhabitations features longer work by authors associated with the blog for you to read and comment.

Dunst, Alexander, Elahe Haschemi Yekani, and Anja Schwarz. “The Here and Now of Cultural Studies.” Journal for the Study of British Cultures 21.2 (2014): 195-222.

Eckstein, Lars, and Anja Schwarz. Postcolonial Piracy: Media Distribution and Cultural Production in the Global South. London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2014.

Dunst, Alexander, “Introduction: Third Reality – On the Persistence of Philip K. Dick”, in: The World According to Philip K. Dick. Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave, 2015, 1-10.

ACS Institute on “Precarious Futures”, 7-12 December 2015: University of the Free State in Bloemfontein

The Association for Cultural Studies (ACS) is delighted to announce the third ACS Institute, which will be held from 7-12 December 2015 at the University of the Free State in Bloemfontein, South Africa. The theme of the 2015 Institute is “Precarious Futures.”

More information here.

Global Inequalities Beyond Occidentalism

Based on theoretical developments in research on world-systems analysis, transnational migration, postcolonial and decolonial perspectives, whilst considering continuities of inequality patterns in the context of colonial and postcolonial realities, Global Inequalities Beyond Occidentalism proposes an original framework for the study of the long-term reproduction of inequalities under global capitalism. With attention to the critical assessment of both Marxist and Weberian perspectives, this book examines the wider 9781409442790.PPC_PPC Templateimplications of transferring classical approaches to inequality to a twenty-first-century context, calling for a reconceptualisation of inequality that is both theoretically informed and methodologically consistent, and able to cater for the implications of shifts from national and Western structures to global structures.

Engaging with approaches to the study of class, gender, racial and ethnic inequalities at the global level, this innovative work adopts a relational perspective in the study of social inequalities that is able to reveal how historical interdependencies between world regions have translated as processes of inequality production and reproduction. As such, it will be of interest to scholars of sociology, political and social theory and anthropology concerned with questions of globalisation and inequality.

Manuela Boatcă. Global Inequalities Beyond Occidentalism. Farnham: Ashgate, 2015.